Category Archives: Favorite Patterns

The Moose Knuckle routinely attends fly tying courses with commercial tiers. The patters we learn will be featured from time to time on this blog along with links to the original pattern creators. If the team is traveling around and notices a previously unknown to us pattern we will feature it. Here you will see updates of new patterns, hot flys and all the info you need to land a hog.

Mother’s Day Shad

Those of you who have followed this blog for a few years will recall that hooking a Shad on the fly has been one of my goals for a few years. Rewinding to 2014, I missed some Hickory Shad on the fly but was unable to land one. I did not attempt to shad fish in 2015 or 2016 due to time constraints and/or work commitments along with the low water levels that made for a poor season. Early 2017 has progressed and the drought has lifted from the Delaware River watershed. This weekend after having Mother’s Day events with the family, I found some time to check the Shad Reports. It was clear to me based on the reports that I should go out and try for some shad on the fly.

My first American Shad and first Shad Fly Fishing!

Fly Gear

I had previously acquired the proper gear for Shad Fly Fishing prior to my earlier Fly Fishing adventures therefore, I had all the necessary equipment and some flies tied up on deck ready to go. I used my St. Croix 7WT Bankrobber Streamer Rod strung up with Rio Sink Tip line and a 8LB test Bass tippet material. As for a fly, I used something called Al’s Shad Fly #4. This consists of a size four or six hook, dumbbell eyes, yellow hackle, yellow hackle tail, yellow yarn and silver tinsel. I also tried out some others but this seemed to get the most attention.

My version of Al’s Shad Fly #4

Where to Look

Using the Fly Rod puts you at a slight disadvantage to a spin fisherman when seeking Shad. On the Delaware, through Warren County, where I typically fish for Smallmouth in the summer there are no major dams for the Shad to “stack up” like they do in Deer Creek, Maryland. Therefore, you must seek out pools downstream of major runs or those created by tributaries. Swinging the fly into slower water pools on the side of fast water or before a major obstacle in the river should yield results.

With some luck, they will still be in the river next weekend an I’ll find some time to target the Shad in between the guide trips I will be running.

Fly Tying Courses

Moose Knuckle Fishing is proud to announce the formation of winter fly tying courses at Knot Just Flies in Blairstown, NJ. The two-hour sessions will be held on most Sundays (11AM to 1PM) during the winter. They will be progressive in nature, starting with the simplest Brassie, moving through the Hare’s Ear and Pheasant Tail nymph. The courses will culminate in March with dry flies.

These fly tying courses are geared to the beginner and will be helpful to intermediate fly tiers as well. Though the courses will be progressive it is entirely possible to miss one and come to the next course. The textbook to follow through this course will be Charlie Craven’s, “Basic Fly Tying.” We recommend picking up a copy at Knot Just Flies once the course gets started.

Please contact Knot Just Flies for details. The cost for these courses will be $20 to cover supplies and materials.

Knot Just Flies

Phone: (862) 233-9229

Address: 61 State Route 94, Blairstown, NJ 07825

Time: Most Sunday’s 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM

Instructor: Christopher Kuhn (MKFF) and guests

Cost: $20

Schedule

Sunday December  6th 2015 – 11:00AM to 1:00PM – The Brassie

Sunday December 20th 2015– 11:00AM to 1:00PM – The Black Beauty (Zebra Midge)

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Simple Stone

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I like to fish pretty aggressively.  I have little regard for the safety of my flies while I am casting them into some tight spots.  With this in mind, I don’t want to worry about losing a fly that took ten minutes to tie up.  I need flies that are quick and easy, but will also catch fish.  I came up with this pattern two years ago while I was in Telluride, CO for the winter.  I was walking a stretch of the San Miguel River and noticed a strong presence of small black winter stoneflies crawling through the snow.  After I tied up some up simple stones, it was my most productive fly for the rest of the time I was in Telluride.  It worked great in Steamboat Springs, CO this year.  The simple stone uses minimal materials and takes no time to tie up.  I tied up a weighted version below; however, I also use un-weighted simple stones as well.  Give it a go, and mix and match colors to satisfy your local stonefly hatch.

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Recipe:

Hook: 12-16 1x Long Nymph

Weight: .025 Round Lead Wire

Thread: Black

Legs:  Black Goose Biots

Body: Black Superfine Dubbing

Step 1:

Take around 10 wraps of lead wire around the front third of the fly.  Secure the lead wire with thread wraps.

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Step 2:

Work your thread to the back of the hook shank, and tie in your first set of goose biots.  Make sure the goose biots cup away from each other.

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Step 3:

Apply dubbing and work your thread to just behind the lead wire base.

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Step 4:

Tie in your next set of goose biots, cupped away from each other.

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Step 5:

Apply dubbing to the thorax portion of the fly.  I use a little more dubbing to build up the body.

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Step 6:

Tie in your final set of goose biots, trim the excess, and whip finish.  That’s it!

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He wanted the stone
Simple Stone on the nose